AUG 2020AUG 2020
PAYMENTform_banner200PAYMENTform_banner200
RATES_banner200RATES_banner200
SIGNUP_banner200SIGNUP_banner200
Magazine Flip
equineSUBSCRIBE_200animationequineSUBSCRIBE_200animation
EC_advertisng_RS200x345EC_advertisng_RS200x345
paykwik al online sportwetten paykasa

TX Gov Suspends EIA Rules to Facilitate Horse Evacuation Ahead of Hurricane Laura

Filed under: Breaking News,Health & Training |     

TAHC

Today, Governor Greg Abbott temporarily suspended portions of the Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC) rules that require negative equine infectious anemia (EIA) tests results in the last 12 months to board, stable or pasture equine at congregation points. The rules were suspended to facilitate the evacuation of equine and equine owners in advance of Hurricane Laura making landfall. This suspension is in effect until terminated by the Office of the Governor or until the 90th day following the suspension.

“I want to thank Governor Abbott for acting swiftly to help Texans protect themselves and their livestock in advance of Hurricane Laura,” said TAHC Executive Director, Dr. Andy Schwartz. “Horses without current equine infectious anemia (EIA) tests should not be turned away from safe shelter during this time. Facility and equine owners can mitigate the risk of disease spread by regularly treating horses with fly repellant and isolating equine without current EIA tests, to the extent possible, from other horses.”

Caring for Livestock During Hurricane Laura

  • Floods can impact animal health as well as human health. Make plans for your livestock and horses in the event you will need to evacuate your farm. For an extensive checklist, click here.

Livestock Hurricane Preparedness

  • Know the types of flood risk in your area. Visit FEMA’s Flood Map Service Center for information.
  • It isn’t too late to make an evacuation plan. Identify safe routes and safe locations (higher elevation) for your livestock.
  • Maintain an inventory of the livestock on your ranch.
  • Have identification for all livestock (ear tags, tattoos, brands).
  • Identify alternate water or power sources.
  • Call 2-1-1 for animal and human shelter information.
  • If you are in immediate danger call 9-1-1.
  • If you come across stray livestock or down fences, contact your local sheriff’s department.
  • If your animal needs medical assistance, contact your local veterinarian.
  • To find out more about livestock preparation visit http://www.prep4agthreats.org/Assets/Factsheets/Floods-andYour-Livestock.pdf.

For daily updates, visit https://www.tahc.texas.gov/emergency/index.html. and follow the TAHC Facebook.

Thank you & stay safe,

Texas Animal Health Commission

paykwik online sportwetten paykasa